4 May 2018
Scotland, UK

Period Pain | How To Relieve It


Menstrual cramps (Dysmenorrhea) are an entire pain.  For some people who have vaginas, it can be so severe enough to interfere with their everyday activities such as school and socialising.  can leave some doubled over in constant agony and not wanting to move a single inch. However, for the lucky ones, periods are just a bit uncomfortable and annoying. Nevertheless, severe menstrual cramps do not have to be the case if you know how to relieve period pain.


So, what are menstrual cramps?
Menstrual cramps can come in the form of; throbbing or cramping pain in the lower abdomen, pain in lower back/thighs or a continuous dull ache. These pains happen due to the hormone-like substance prostaglandins which are released during menstruation to assist the uterus muscles in contracting to remove the uterus lining. However, higher levels of prostaglandins are associated with more severe menstrual cramps. Menstrual cramps can start before or during menstruation and many get them regularly.

What are risk factors for having severe menstrual cramps?
There are a number of risk factors for having severe menstrual cramps which include; being younger than 30, starting puberty at 11 years old or younger, having heavy menstrual bleeding/irregular bleeding, smoking and a family history of menstrual cramps.
Period, Pain, and How: How period pain feels like
Via Pintrest
How do I relieve menstrual cramps?

Exercise.
Exercise is probably the last thing you want to do whilst you have menstrual cramps but exercise routines can help to loosen muscles which help provide menstrual cramp relief.

Rub your lower tummy.  
Rubbing your lower tummy helps to relax the muscles which aids in menstrual cramps relief.

Medication.
Taking over-the-counter anti-inflammatory’s help to relieve menstrual cramps. The likes of Ibuprofen helps decrease pain but also decrease the number contractions of the uterus at the same time. However, for best relief anti-inflammatory must be taken as soon as bleeding or cramps start.

Supplements.
Vitamin B1 and magnesium may reduce menstrual cramps, bloating and other premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms.  

Heat.
Using the likes of a heat patch or hot water bottle on your lower belly or back can reduce menstrual cramps. You can also take a warm bath to get the same effect.

When is a good time to see a doctor?
If you’ve taken pain relief and you are still experiencing extreme menstrual cramps which disrupt your life monthly, it is a good time to talk to your doctor.  You should also see your doctor if your menstrual pain gets significantly worse or you start having severe pain after the age of 25.

Should I bring anything to the doctors?
Bringing a menstrual cycle chart and food chart to your appointment can be useful for your doctor to understand in better detail what might be the cause of significant menstrual cramps. It can also be of great use to making sure to note any medication, minerals and supplements taken during your period to take with you to the appointment.

Conclusion
The intensity of pain during menstruation varies from one individual to another. This is often due to the frequency of uterus contractions which causes pain in the abdomen. Exercise, take anti-inflammatory medications and apply heat on painful areas can help lessen menstrual cramps. However, if you notice a change in your symptoms discuss this with a doctor

Let me know in the comments if you like this style of writing or if this post was helpful. 

                                   


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6 comments:

  1. Using heat always works for me! Thanks for the other tips.

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  2. For me what helps is heat and a large pillow just under my stomach and slightly between my legs. Eases the pain for me. Great post!

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  3. Some brilliant tips! I find supplements do me really well x

    Elise // elssthinks.co.uk

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  4. Hi! Nice post. For most girls heating with hot water bag works. And mefenamic acid is what most commonly used for specifically treating menstrual pain, however, like you said, any NSAID would work.

    Thanks for sharing this post!

    xx,
    Quirky.

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  5. Heat is always my go-to! Or strong painkillers haha. Great post, thanks for sharing!

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  6. The pain ia unbearable at times.. but there are so many ways to cure it..
    A very informative post .. :D

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